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  • 07/01/15--22:56: In proportion
  • A long low trough-like basin in pale stone is cleverly contrasted by a vertical ladder. This blackened towel rail ladder links proportionally and tonally to the shelf below the basin and the large black-framed windows.


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    Maggie Beer's Spring Harvest Recipes brings together all of Maggie Beer's signature recipes from her spring chapter of Maggie's Harvest, including detailed descriptions of seasonal ingredients  and inspiring accounts of memorable meals with family and friends.

    The recipes highlight Maggie's philosophy of using the freshest and best seasonal produce available in the Barossa Valley South Australia, and treating it simply, allowing the natural flavours to speak for themselves. Describing herself as a 'country cook', Maggie cooks from the heart and is passionate about instilling in others this same confidence – to use recipes as a starting point, and be guided by instinct and personal taste.

    This book from one of Australia's best-loved cooks is essential for anyone with an appreciation of the pleasures of sourcing, cooking and sharing seasonal food.

    Kitchen
    $29.99
    ISBN-13: 
    9781921384233
    176 pages
    Format: 
    Paperback
    Date Published: 
    26/08/2015
    3D Image: 
    Available in eBook: 
    Sort Title: 
    Maggie Beer's Spring Harvest Recipes

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  • 07/01/15--23:38: Snapper in a parcel
  • Serving fish en papillote is a breeze, and it means that you can create any number of different sauces by just adding a few flavourings to the parcel before cooking: a little butter, cream, extra virgin olive oil, wine, fresh herbs, slices of meyer lemon or a dash of lemon or lime juice, in whatever combination takes your fancy. Salmon fillets or cutlets are also delicious when treated this way. 

    Method

    1. Heat a little extra virgin olive oil in a frying pan, then sauté the fennel over medium heat until cooked through.
    2. Preheat the oven to 200°C. Liberally oil 4 sheets of baking paper or foil large enough to wrap the fish fillets. Arrange the cooked fennel and reserved fronds on the paper as a bed for the fish. Position the fillets on top, then add the lemon slices, followed by the chervil or bay leaves if using. Drizzle with extra virgin olive oil, then season and carefully fold in the edges to seal the parcel. Transfer the parcels to a baking tray (a scone tray is ideal for this) and bake for 8 minutes. Let the fish rest for another 5 minutes before serving. 
    3. When everyone opens their parcels they will be surrounded by a wonderful aroma as the juices spill onto the plate. Drizzle over a little more extra virgin olive oil, add a boiled waxy spud and a green vegie or salad and your meal is complete.
    Maggie Beer
    Serves 4

    extra virgin olive oil, for cooking

    1 small fennel bulb, trimmed and sliced, fronds reserved

    4 × 200 g snapper fillets of equal thickness, skin removed

    1 meyer lemon, sliced

    handful fresh chervil sprigs or bay leaves, optional

    sea salt flakes and freshly ground black pepper

    Maggie Beer's Spring Harvest Recipes
    Other tags: 

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  • 07/01/15--23:45: Roast leg of suffolk lamb
  • Method

    1. Remove the lamb from the refrigerator 2 hours before cooking to allow it to come to room temperature. Preheat the oven to 180°C. Combine the rosemary and olive oil and then rub all over the lamb skin. Make 12 incisions in the skin evenly over the surface of the lamb and insert garlic slices. Rub liberally with salt.
    2. Place the lamb in a roasting pan and roast for 30 minutes. Turn the oven down to 160°C. Turn the lamb leg over and cook for another 20 minutes. Turn the lamb leg over again and cook for another 30 minutes. Turn the oven off and leave the lamb in the oven for 30 minutes with the door ajar.
    3. Remove from the oven, pour off the pan juices into a tall jug and refrigerate the juices to solidify the fat so it can be skimmed from the surface. Leave the lamb to rest in a warm place for another 30 minutes. Remove the fat from the juices, then place the pan juices and verjuice in a saucepan and reduce over high heat to serve as a jus.
    4. Serve with a green olive tapenade and labna. 
    Maggie Beer
    Serve 6

    1 × 3 kg leg lamb

    3 sprigs rosemary, leaves picked and finely chopped

    ¼ cup (60 ml) extra virgin olive oil

    3 cloves garlic, sliced lengthways into 4

    2 tablespoons sea salt flakes

    ½ cup (125 ml) verjuice

    Maggie Beer's Spring Harvest Recipes

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    This cake is very similar to one I made as a prize for a charity fund-raiser – a recipe written especially for the highest bidder. The concept was that the winner would choose the nature of the dish and at first I thought I’d bitten off more than I could chew, as the request was for a first birthday cake. How to make something so familiar different was more of a challenge for me, a person who hardly makes cakes at all, as I wanted it to be a cake that could possibly become a family tradition. I thought long and hard about it and, using my eldest granddaughter Zöe (who was seven at the time) as my critic, I cooked cake after cake for her approval. I sent the recipe on to the winner accompanied by a letter saying how I hoped that this was a cake that the child could make on their own, when they were old enough, and that it could grow as they grew, with different variations on a theme.

    The cake turned out to be such a hit with Zöe, who has a palate like mine and seldom eats cake, but I have altered it slightly to keep the exclusivity of the original recipe. 

    As, in my experience, everyone fights for the icing, I have been very generous with the quantity so it can be spread thickly over the cake.

    Method

    1. Preheat the oven to 180°C. Grease an 18 cm cake tin with a little butter, then line with baking paper and lightly spray with vegetable oil.
    2. Sift flour, baking powder and salt together into a bowl. In a separate bowl, add the vanilla extract to the buttermilk. Using an electric mixer, cream the butter on medium speed for 2–3 minutes or until pale, then, with the motor running, add the sugar in a steady stream. If the mixture is not well combined, scrape the sides of the bowl with a rubber spatula and mix for another 3 minutes.
    3. Add the whole eggs, one at a time, and beat for 30 seconds after adding each one. Add the egg yolks, one at a time, and beat for 30 seconds after adding each one. Add the lemon rind, then pour in the oil and mix well with a rubber spatula. Fold in half of the flour mixture, then scrape the sides of the bowl and fold in half of the buttermilk mixture. Fold in the remaining flour, scraping the sides down well, then fold in the remaining butter-milk. Pour the batter into the prepared cake tin.
    4. Bake for about 35 minutes or until the edges begin to come away from the sides of the tin. Cool in the tin for 15 minutes, then invert onto a cooling rack covered with baking paper. Peel the baking paper from the base of the cake, then turn, right-side up, onto another rack. Leave to cool before icing. 
    5. For the icing, add the lemon rind and juice and the icing sugar to the butter and stir to combine; add extra lemon juice to taste, as desired. Once the cake is cool, spread it thickly with the icing. 
    6. Alternatively, you can leave the cake un-iced and top with really ripe strawberries. It is wonderful sliced and served with a dollop of mascarpone.
    Maggie Beer
    Serves 8

    butter, for greasing

    vegetable oil spray, for greasing

    1½ cups (225 g) self-raising flour

    1½ teaspoons baking powder

    ¼ teaspoon salt

    1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

    ½ cup (125 ml) buttermilk, at room temperature

    125 g unsalted butter, at room temperature

    1¼ cups (275 g) sugar

    2 large eggs, at room temperature

    3 large egg yolks, at room temperature

    finely grated rind of 2 lemons

    1/3 cup (80 ml) extra virgin olive oil

    really ripe strawberries, to serve

    LEMON BUTTER ICING

    100 g butter, softened

    finely grated rind of 2 lemons

    ¼ cup (60 ml) lemon juice, plus extra to taste

    2 2/3 cups (430 g) icing sugar, sifted

    Maggie Beer's Spring Harvest Recipes

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  • 07/02/15--18:14: Greek
  • Away from his restaurant kitchens what George Calombaris really loves to cook is the food he grew up with, food that is made with love and designed to be shared. In his exciting new cookbook, George shares his enthusiasm for all things Greek, adding modern tweaks to stamp his adventurous culinary spirit on traditional recipes.

    This is traditional Greek food, but not as you know it! George has created dishes that you know and love and given them a modern twist. You could start with a baklava cocktail, moving on to dishes such as taramosalata popcorn, ouzo-soaked cucumbers, slow-cooked lamb and miso eggplant souvlaki and prawn saganaki tortellini with tomato and mustard seed vinaigrette. And to finish? Hellenic mess!

    Photography by Earl Carter

    Kitchen
    $59.99
    ISBN-13: 
    9781921383335
    320 pages
    Format: 
    Hardcover
    Date Published: 
    21/10/2015
    3D Image: 
    Available in eBook: 
    Author Images: 
    Sort Title: 
    Greek

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    You may have heard of the saying ‘when it rains pumpkins, make soup and sell it’. Well in the same spirit I say when peas are in season, make this salad. It’s colourful, super-fresh and really yummy. For maximum flavour, make sure the peas are at room temperature when you serve the salad.

    Method

    1. Heat the olive oil in a frying pan over medium heat, add the onion and cook until translucent. Add the cream and half the cauliflower and simmer gently over low heat for 10–12 minutes or until tender, stirring frequently to avoid any colouration. Strain, reserving the cooking liquid. Transfer the cauliflower and onion to a blender and blend to a smooth puree, adding a little of the reserved cooking liquid as required.
    2. Bring a small saucepan of water to the boil and cook the peas for 1 minute, then refresh in iced water. Drain.
    3. Preheat the oven to 160°C (fan-forced).
    4. To make the oregano salt, combine the dried oregano, salt and sugar in a small bowl.
    5. Toast the almonds in the oven for 10 minutes or until golden, then roughly chop and season with a little oregano salt.
    6. To make the lemon dressing, whisk together the lemon juice and olive oil. Season to taste with oregano salt. 
    7. Heat the oil for deep-frying in a deep-fryer to 180°C (or in a heavy-based saucepan until a cube of bread browns in 15 seconds). Add the remaining cauliflower florets and deep-fry until golden. Remove with a slotted spoon and drain on paper towel. Season with oregano salt.
    8. In a mixing bowl, combine the peas, cauliflower florets, almonds and lemon dressing.
    9. Spoon the cauliflower puree onto a serving place, top with the mixed salad and garnish with young pea tendrils (if using). Serve cold.
    George Calombaris
    Serves 4

    2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

    1 brown onion, diced

    300 ml pure cream (45% fat)

    500 g cauliflower, trimmed and cut into small florets

    1½ cups (240 g) green peas

    50 g blanched almonds

    vegetable oil, for deep-frying

    large handful of pea tendrils (optional)

    OREGANO SALT

    ¼ teaspoon dried oregano

    ¼ teaspoon salt flakes

    ¼ teaspoon caster sugar

    LEMON DRESSING

    1 tablespoon lemon juice

    2½ tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

    Greek

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    Throughout my career I’ve heard so many old wives’ tales about cooking. I’ve been told to add oil to pasta water so the pasta won’t stick. I’ve been told to add kiwi pulp to calamari to make it tender. All nonsense. All you need to remember is to buy fresh and in season and your calamari will be super-tender. The crispy vine leaves are not essential, but they are a great way to introduce saltiness to the dish.

    Method
    1. Trim the skin from the watermelon and cut the flesh into thick rectangles about 15 cm × 5 cm. Store in the fridge until needed.
    2. Heat the oil for deep-frying in a deep-fryer to 180°C (or in a heavy-based saucepan until a cube of bread browns in 15 seconds). Remove the vine leaves from the brine and pat dry with paper towel. Dust with flour, shaking off any excess, then deep-fry until crispy. Remove with a slotted spoon and drain on paper towel.
    3. Meanwhile, heat a chargrill pan or barbecue grill or flatplate until hot. Drizzle the olive oil over the calamari and season with salt and pepper. Grill the calamari until lightly charred and the flesh has no transparency. 
    4. Arrange the watermelon, olives and goat’s curd on a serving plate. Put the calamari and crisp vine leaves on top and finish with parsley leaves, a drizzle of olive oil and a final grinding of salt and pepper.
    George Calombaris
    Serves 4

    ¼ small watermelon

    vegetable oil, for deep-frying

    50 g vine leaves in brine

    1/3 cup (50 g) plain flour

    2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, plus extra to garnish

    500 g calamari, cleaned, scored and cut into bite-sized pieces, tentacles reserved

    salt flakes and cracked pepper

    200 g green olives

    200 g goat’s curd, broken into small pieces

    flat-leaf parsley, to garnish

    Greek

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  • 07/02/15--18:40: Hellenic Mess
  • This dish pays homage to the financial situation in Greece. We all know it’s a mess. In saying that, there are two things that no one can take away from the Greeks: their pride and their passion. I say this to young cooks all the time: if you don’t have pride and passion then don’t become a chef.

    Method

    1. To make the meringue, preheat the oven to 200°C (fan-forced) and line a large baking tray with baking paper. Spread the sugar evenly over the prepared tray and place in the oven for 8 minutes or until the sugar starts to dissolve around the edges. When the sugar is nearly ready, start to whisk the egg whites in an electric mixer until the whites begin to froth. Carefully add the hot sugar and the rosewater and whisk for a further 10 minutes.
    2. Reduce the oven temperature to 100°C (fan-forced) and line a baking tray with baking paper. Spread the meringue over the prepared tray, then transfer to the oven and bake for 3 hours. Remove and allow to cool completely, then break into bite-sized chunks.
    3. Meanwhile, to make the jelly, place all the ingredients and 200 ml water in a small saucepan and allow to sit for 2 minutes so the gelatine leaves soften. Stir over medium heat until the sugar and gelatine have dissolved, then pour into a suitable container and place in the fridge to set. This will take at least 2–3 hours.
    4. For the strawberry sauce, blitz the strawberries in a food processor, then pass through a fine-mesh sieve. Place in a saucepan with the sugar and ouzo stir over medium heat until the sugar has dissolved. Store in the fridge until needed.
    5. Shortly before you are ready to serve, whip the cream and vanilla seeds until firm peaks form.
    6. Layer the chunks of meringue, jelly and dollops of whipped cream in a serving dish. At the last minute, drizzle over the strawberry sauce and finish with a sprinkling of flaked almonds.
    George Calombaris
    Serves 8

    1½ cups (375 ml) thickened cream

    1 vanilla bean, split, seeds scraped

    ½ cup (40 g) flaked almonds, toasted

    MERINGUE

    240 g caster sugar

    4 egg whites

    1 teaspoon rosewater

    ORANGE BLOSSOM JELLY

    200 ml orange blossom water

    100 g caster sugar

    5 gelatine leaves (gold strength)

    STRAWBERRY SAUCE

    250 g strawberries, washed and hulled

    ½ cup (110 g) caster sugar

    1½ tablespoons ouzo

    Greek

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    These are the heavenly ice-cream sandwiches of your childhood. Even better – the ice-cream recipe doesn’t begin with a custard, and so avoids the ‘will it or won’t it?’ curdling fear.

    Method

    1. In a large bowl, whisk together the cream, milk and sugar, and stir until the sugar dissolves. Churn in an ice-cream machine according to the manufacturer’s instructions.
    2. Toss the cherries with the extra teaspoon of sugar. Add the cherries, along with any juice, and the chocolate to the ice-cream mixture. Transfer to a container with a lid and freeze until firm enough to scoop.
    3. To assemble the sandwiches, spread 1/3 cup (80 g) of ice-cream over a biscuit and top with another biscuit. Repeat with the remaining biscuits and ice-cream. Wrap tightly in baking paper and freeze until ready to serve. The sandwiches will keep for 24 hours in the freezer.
    Indira Naidoo
    Makes 18

    2 cups (500 ml) thickened cream

    1 cup (250 ml) full-cream milk

    ¾ cup (165 g) caster sugar, plus 1 teaspoon extra

    1½ cups (225 g) frozen cherries, partially thawed

    85 g dark chocolate (70 per cent cocoa), roughly chopped

    36 plain chocolate biscuits (Arnott’s Choc Ripple biscuits or similar)

    The Edible City

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    What do you need to get started?

    • a piece of land (and permission to use it)
    • six or more hours of sunshine on at least part of the land
    • a source of water
    • funding source (plot rental fees, sponsorship)
    • materials: tools (and a safe place to keep them), soil, compost, fertilisers, edging or fencing material, and plants or seeds
    • an organisational approach and a plot plan
    • someone knowledgeable about gardening
    • people to do the gardening
    • a formal or informal management team
    • a good communication strategy (website, regular email updates, newsletters, etc)
     

    Image of Fitzroy Community Garden - Photography by Alan Benson


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    So many food trends come and go. Right now kale is having its moment in the culinary limelight and I hope it never goes out of fashion. It is so versatile and nutritious. I like serving a wedge of this tart with a bitter leaf salad, which helps to cut through the richness.

    Method

    1. Preheat the oven to 180°C fan-forced (200°C conventional).
    2. Sprinkle the pastry sheet with the thyme leaves. Roll it out to fit a pie dish 27 cm in diameter and 5 cm deep. Prick the base all over with a fork. Line with baking paper and fill with baking beans or rice, then blind-bake for 10–12 minutes or until lightly golden. Remove from the oven and remove the paper and baking beans. Brush the base with the beaten egg, return to the oven and bake for 6 minutes until golden and crisp.
    3. Reduce the oven temperature to 150°C.
    4. Place the kale in a large heavy-based saucepan over medium heat. Place a lid on top and allow to soften and wilt for 15–20 minutes.
    5. Heat the olive oil in a frying pan over medium heat and add the onion. Fry for 4–5 minutes until soft. Add the kale and mustard seeds and cook for a further minute. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Spread the kale mix over the tart case, then sprinkle over the parsley and scatter over the blue cheese.
    6. In a bowl, whisk the eggs, yolks, cream and sour cream. Season with salt and pepper to taste, then pour into the tart case. Place the prosciutto strips on top.
    7. Bake for 40–50 minutes or until light golden and just set with a slight wobble.
    8. Leave to stand for 10 minutes, then serve.
    Indira Naidoo
    Serves 8

    1 pre-rolled butter puff pastry sheet, thawed

    2 tablespoons thyme leaves

    1 egg, beaten

    1 large bunch kale, finely chopped

    1 tablespoon olive oil

    1 onion, thinly sliced

    1 teaspoon brown mustard seeds

    salt and freshly ground black pepper

    small handful chopped flat-leaf parsley

    180 g blue cheese, chopped

    2 eggs (extra)

    4 egg yolks

    200 ml pouring cream

    200 g sour cream

    200 g prosciutto (about 4 strips)

    The Edible City

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  • 07/15/15--23:56: Maggie's Christmas
  • Christmas is Maggie Beer's favourite time of year, a time for everything she loves – for hugs from the grandchildren, for giving, and for creating special memories. But most of all, it is a time for family and friends to gather around a table groaning with delicious food.

    With her hallmark generosity and warmth, Maggie invites you to join her Christmas celebrations in South Australia's beautiful Barossa Valley. From roasting the perfect turkey and transforming leftovers into fabulous meals, to turning ripe summer fruits into luscious desserts and creating a glamorous formal dinner to welcome in the New Year in style, Maggie shares her most cherished recipes. With plenty of advice for stress-free entertaining, Maggie shows you how to celebrate this special time of year with panache and joy.

    'I have never lost the excitement of Christmas and all it entails. From my earliest memories, it's always been about celebrating the season and the pleasures of a bountiful table with family and friends. In sharing the recipes and rituals that make this such a special time of year for me, I hope to inspire you to create your own traditions.'

    Photography by Earl Carter

    Kitchen
    $39.99
    ISBN-13: 
    9781921384400
    368 pages
    Format: 
    Paperback
    Date Published: 
    23/09/2015
    3D Image: 
    Available in eBook: 
    Sort Title: 
    Maggie's Christmas

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    Literary Dinner with Simon Bryant 
    Please join Simon Bryant for a very special dinner at The Lane Vineyard, 5 Ravenswood Lane, Hahndorf, as we celebrate the launch of Vegetables, Grains and Other Good Stuff. Simon will be the guest on the evening to talk about the book, his 25-year career as a chef and his thoughts on ethical and sustainable food issues. The ticket price includes a seated dinner, with food prepared from the book by the award-winning kitchen at The Lane, and all accompanying matched wines.  
    Cost: $130 includes all food and matched wine or $160 and includes a copy of Vegetables, Grains and Other Good Stuff
    Contact:
    diningroom@thelane.com.au
    P: 08 8388 1250

    literary dinner
    Kitchen
    Thursday, August 6, 2015 - 18:30
    SA
    08 8388 1250
    Simon Bryant

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  • 07/16/15--17:40: Truffle Festival
  • Truffle Festival: Cooking demonstration and book signing with Simon Bryant
    Simon Bryant will be signing copies of his latest book, Vegetables Grains and Other Good Stuff, as well as cooking some of his dishes, at the Adelaide Central Market.

    Book signing
    Kitchen
    Saturday, August 8, 2015 - 09:00
    SA
    08 8203 7494
    Simon Bryant

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    Author Talk with Simon Bryant 
    Simon Bryant will be signing copies of his latest book, Vegetables Grains and Other Good Stuff, at City Library Adelaide.

    Book signing
    Kitchen
    Saturday, August 8, 2015 - 11:00
    SA
    08 8203 7990
    Simon Bryant

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    Literary Dinner with Simon Bryant 

    Simon Bryant, of ABC TV’s The Cook and the Chef fame, will be in Melbourne for one day only and Readings is delighted to be hosting an evening event with him in partnership with Hawthorn’s Crabapple Kitchen. Please join us for a delicious meal and a chance to meet Simon as he talks about his latest book, Vegetables, Grains & Other Good Stuff

    Cost: $100 per person, includes a signed copy of Vegetables, Grains and Other Good Stuff and a 2-course meal with matching wine

    Book signing
    Kitchen
    Monday, August 10, 2015 - 18:30
    SA
    03 9819 1917
    Simon Bryant

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  • 07/16/15--22:47: Cooking Demonstration
  • Cooking demonstration with Alessandro Pavoni and Roberta Muir 
    Join Alessandro Pavoni and Roberta Muir at the Sydney Italian Wine and Food Festival for a cooking demonstration featuring dishes from their new book A Lombardian Cookbook
    Cost:
    $50

     

    Cooking demonstration
    Kitchen
    Sunday, August 30, 2015 - 11:00
    NSW
    Alessandro Pavoni
    Roberta Muir

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  • 07/16/15--22:50: Cooking class
  • Cooking class with Alessandro Pavoni and Roberta Muir 
    Join Alessandro Pavoni and Roberta Muir for a cooking class at the Sydney Seafood School featuring dishes from their new book A Lombardian Cookbook
    Cost:
    $165

     

    Cooking class
    Kitchen
    Saturday, September 5, 2015 - 11:00
    NSW
    02 9004 1111
    Alessandro Pavoni
    Roberta Muir

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  • 07/20/15--19:36: Janet Hawley
  • Janet Hawley enjoyed a huge readership in her thirty-year career as senior feature writer on Good Weekend Magazine, published in the Sydney Morning Herald and The Age.

    She's renowned for her intimate profiles of artists and creative people, and trusted by her interview subjects to explore their private worlds and mysteries of the creative process. She's published two books on artists, Artists In Conversation and  Encounters With Australian Artists. Her book A Place On The Coast, co-authored with Philip Cox, explores love of gardens, art and architecture.

    Her wide-ranging feature writing for the  Sydney Morning Herald, The Age and The Australian  has won her numerous major awards, including two Walkley Awards and the Gold Walkley.

    Janet's long friendship with Brett and Wendy Whiteley led to her writing the story of Wendy's major opus, the Secret Garden.

    author_listing_image: 
    author_bio_image: 
    author_category: 
    Garden
    Life & Style
    First Name: 
    Janet
    Last Name: 
    Hawley

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