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  • 10/31/13--19:32: Recipe Snap Competition
  • Rodney Dunn’s chicken soup, by Allie Webb

    The Lantern team show they’re not just all talk by cooking up a storm from their favourite Lantern cookbooks. OK, the end results may not look exactly like the pictures – but trust us, the flavours made up for any rough edges…

    Simply use a Lantern cookbook to create your own RECIPE SNAP on instagram and hashtag #recipesnap to go into the running to win a copy of Guy Grossi’s ‘Love Italy’.

    At the end of the competition, we’ll also feature some of the best snaps on this blog and will encourage the authors of the recipes to comment.

    Competition closes 30 November, 2013. For competition terms and conditions, please look under 'legal'. 

    Guy Grossi’s olive oil cake, by Allie Webb

    Karen Martini’s black pepper, walnut and cumin-stuffed chicken roasted with pumpkin, by Alison Cowan

    Justin North’s prawn, chilli and mint spaghetti, by Emily O’Neill

    David Herbert’s brownies, by Julie Gibbs

    Sharon Salloum’s beetroot dip, by Nicole Abadee

    Christine Manfield’s beef and potato rendang (made with goat!), by Jocelyn Hungerford

    David Herbert’s blueberry swirl cheesecake (with Lantern website on laptop…), by Anna Scobie

    David Herbert’s chocolate crackle cookies, by Anna Scobie


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  • 11/01/13--02:00: Welcome!
  • Lantern carving artwork by Melbourne artist Nicholas Jones– Photo by Jason Busch

    Welcome to the Lantern blog, where we’ll be posting stories and highlights from the beautiful world of illustrated books.

    We’ll be offering you glimpses behind the scenes of what we do here at Lantern, as well as bringing you guest posts from our talented Lantern authors, photographers, stylists and illustrators. And there’ll be competitions where you can win copies of our latest titles or one-off Lantern experiences.

    Want more? To inspire you in the kitchen, we’ll bring you recipes and menu suggestions. Postcards from our travels and hot tips from our widely travelled authors will get you planning – or at least dreaming about – your next trip.               

    Closer to home, we’ll also share our favourite discoveries: books, of course, but also films, art exhibitions, architecture, gardens, classes, craft projects and whatever else is inspiring us right now.

    We hope you’ll share your Lantern-inspired experiences with us too, and become part of the Lantern community. Because we put so much time and care into every Lantern project, we always love to hear about the lives our books lead after they leave our hands.

    Here’s just a taste of what we’ll be bringing you. Please visit often and we’ll keep you posted… And if you need a reminder, sign up to receive our newsletter


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  • 11/12/13--22:23: Slow-cooked Zucchini
  • Until my last trip to Italy I would never have eaten zucchini unless it was small and only just cooked. The moment of change came at a restaurant in Rome when I was served a dish of zucchini and beans that had been cooked so long and slow, then drizzled with extra virgin olive oil and served with parmesan. It was an epiphany of taste, so different from eating small, young, quickly cooked zucchini, that I started to leave some of my zucchinis to mature a bit more before picking, particularly when planning to cook for a big group. Whilst this won’t thrill your eye in quite the same way as just-cooked zucchini, believe me, it’s delicious.

    Method
    1. Place the zucchini slices in a single layer on a large wire rack, then sprinkle with 2 tablespoons salt. Leave to stand for 40–60 minutes, then rinse off the salt and dry really well with paper towel, squeezing out any excess moisture.
    2. Heat the olive oil in a heavy-based saucepan with a tight-fitting lid over medium heat. Add the garlic and saute for 1 minute or until fragrant, then add the zucchini and stir to coat in the oil. Reduce the heat to low, then cover and cook for 30 minutes. Add the verjuice, then season to taste with salt and pepper. Cover and cook for another 30 minutes or until the zucchini is very soft and meltingly tender; check occasionally and use a simmer mat if the zucchini starts to catch on the base of the pan.
    3. Drain the zucchini, if desired, then check and adjust the seasoning, if necessary. Transfer to a large bowl, then scatter with the basil and mint and drizzle with olive oil. Serve warm or at room temperature.
     
    Maggie Beer
    Serves 8 as an accompaniment

    1 kg zucchini (courgettes), cut into 2 cm-thick slices

    sea salt

    ¼ cup (60 ml) extra virgin olive oil, plus extra for drizzling

    3 cloves garlic, thinly sliced

    1/3 cup (80 ml) verjuice

    freshly ground black pepper

    3 tablespoons basil leaves

    3 tablespoons mint leaves

    Maggie's Christmas

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  • 11/12/13--22:43: Tomato-infused mussel soup
  • Richly flavoured with a just hint of citrus, the secret ingredient in this robust soup is the briny seawater that infuses the tomato as the mussels open.

    Method
    1. Heat the olive oil in a large heavy-based saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion and garlic and cook for a few minutes until lightly coloured, then add the carrot, celery, chilli and bay leaves and sauté for 5 minutes. Stir in the tomato paste. Deglaze with the white wine, then cook until reduced by a third, about 5 minutes.
    2. Add the tomatoes and season with salt and pepper, then add 1 litre of water and the lemon zest and bring to the boil. Turn down the heat to a gentle simmer and cook for 20 minutes.
    3. Add the mussels to the pan, then cover with a lid. Cook for 3–5 minutes until the mussels have opened. Sprinkle over the chopped parsley and serve.
     
    Guy Grossi
    Serves 6

    1½ tablespoons olive oil

    1 onion, finely diced

    2 cloves garlic, sliced

    1 carrot, peeled and finely diced

    2 sticks celery, diced

    ½ long red chilli, seeded and chopped

    4 bay leaves

    100 g tomato paste

    300 ml white wine

    1.6 kg tomatoes, roughly chopped, then passed through a mouli food mill or blended in a food processor

    sea salt and cracked black pepper

    finely grated zest of 1 lemon

    1.5 kg mussels, scrubbed and debearded

    3 tablespoons chopped flat-leaf parsley

    Love Italy

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    Gallery exhibition with Meredith Gaston, author of 101 Moments of Joy & Inspiration

    To coincide with the release of Meredith’s latest book, ‘101 Moments of Joy and Inspiration,’ you are invited to join her for the opening of her new show at Manyung Gallery, featuring original works from the book as well as other, never before seen works on canvas and paper. Bring along family and friends to meet the artist and illustrator Meredith Gaston who has received international recognition for her enchanting paintings.
    Contact staff@manyunggallery.com.au
    P (03) 9509 8999 

    Art exhibition
    Life & Style
    Thursday, November 28, 2013 - 18:00
    VIC
    Meredith Gaston

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    Literary dinner with Carla Coulson, author of Naples: A Way of Love

    Celebrate the latest book by with photographer Carla Coulson, who along with writer Lisa Clifford in their latest book taken you on a journey through the dazzling, magical city Naples, that they both know so intimately. Tickets $30/$60 (incl. book).

    Contact Beaumaris Books
    
P (03) 9589 4638 

    Literary dinner
    Life & Style
    Tuesday, December 10, 2013 - 19:30
    VIC
    Carla Coulson

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    Styling Inspiration workshop with Megan Morton, author of Things I Love

    Find your own style in this clever workshop with Megan, that will go beyond just inspirational images and show you how to turn your tear sheets, clippings, pinned pages and inspirations into beautiful workable ideas. You will leave with a workbook that is an interior scheme in the making. Price $450 (including lunch and materials).
    Contact The School- 
    classes@theschool.com.au
    P (02) 9693 2782 

    Styling workshop
    Life & Style
    Saturday, March 22, 2014 - 10:00
    NSW
    Megan Morton

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    Selling and styling workshop with Megan Morton, author of Things I Love

    Selling your property? Let talented stylist Megan share some of her ingenious styling concepts and insights to solve the practical issues at hand. A tips-and-tricks workshop that is also practical, all types of housing will be covered. Price is $450 (includes lunch and all necessary materials).
    Contact The School- classes@theschool.com.au
    P (02) 9693 2782 

    Styling workshop
    Life & Style
    Saturday, February 9, 2013 - 10:00
    NSW
    Megan Morton

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  • 11/17/13--19:58: Science of styling workshop
  • with Megan Morton, author of Things I Love

    What is the key to styling? Can we learn it? Living and breathing all matters of the home, Megan has a knack for creating beautiful rooms that make people obscenely happy.  Come find your inner stylist and learn about the visual language that is styling- through theory and practical. Price $450 (includes lunch and all materials).
    Contact The School- classes@theschool.com.au
    P (02) 9693 2782 

    Science of Styling
    Life & Style
    Saturday, February 22, 2014 - 10:00
    NSW
    Megan Morton

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  • 11/17/13--21:14: Dominique Rizzo food tour
  • Food tour with Dominique Rizzo, author of My Taste of Sicily


    Over 16 days, journey to Eastern Sicily and some of the most beautiful historical provinces, including the islands of the Aeolian, with Dominique Rizzo as your guide. Dine on regional artisan products, immerse yourself in cooking classes, cheese and wine tastings and discover a past that is rich in ancient history and architectural design. 
    Contact Pure Food Cooking Tours
    www.purefoodcookingtours.com.au 

    Food tour
    Travel
    Sunday, June 15, 2014 - 09:00
    NSW
    Dominique Rizzo

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    I love wandering through the village in my home of Greece. No matter what the season, there is always something fabulous to photograph. I pass George’s workshop pretty much every day and can't resist looking in, it’s like an Aladdin's cave. George is now retired but he was thrilled when I asked recently if I could photograph him. It was even more exciting when his grandson, Mario dropped in. I could not resist the opportunity to photograph them together.

    Claire Lloyd, author of My Greek Island Home.


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  • 11/20/13--18:13: Sweet Summer
  • Mamma's lemon mousse by Silvia Colloca – Photo by Chris Chen

    This week’s Lantern recipe is a delicious lemon mousse from Silvia Colloca who fondly remembers this dessert from her childhood. Young or old, this one is sure to be a crowd pleaser. 

     

    Mamma's lemon mousse


    Serves 6

    Sometime in the mid-eighties, Mamma was working as a market researcher for an advertising company in Milan. The lady she mostly collaborated with was an eccentric woman in her forties with platinum blonde hair, a permanent Caribbean tan, and a cigarette glued to her massive red lips. Anna spoke with a very posh Milanese accent and wouldn’t roll her ‘R’s, in the way of mere mortal Italians, employing the breathy French version instead. When she first tasted Mamma’s humble lemon mousse, she paused, licked the spoon clean and, in her 40-a-day husky voice, pronounced it ‘superrrbo’. And how right she was.

    I confess I haven’t had this since I was a little girl. I have such fond memories of it, and can’t quite understand why it fell out of favour at some point. I think it’s time for a revival. The eighties are back!

     

    2 cups (500 ml) water
    50 g unsalted butter
    peeled rind and juice of 1 lemon
    3 eggs, separated
    250 g caster sugar
    1 teaspoon vanilla paste or extract, or the scraped seeds from 1 vanilla bean
    60 g plain flour
    shortbread and fresh berries, to serve (optional)

    Method

    1. Put the water, butter and lemon rind in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Simmer until the butter has melted, then set aside.

    2. Whisk together the egg yolks and sugar for about 1–2 minutes or until they look pale and creamy. Stir in the vanilla and flour. Gradually add the butter mixture, whisking constantly to combine.

    3. Pour the mixture back into the saucepan and bring to a simmer, stirring regularly to prevent lumps forming. Reduce the heat to low and cook, stirring with a wooden spoon, for 2–3 minutes or until the cream starts to thicken. Remove from the heat and add the lemon juice. Pour into a bowl and cool for 20 minutes at room temperature. Remove and discard the lemon rind.

    4. Whisk the egg whites with hand-held electric beaters until they form soft peaks. Dollop 2 tablespoons of the egg white into the cooled lemon cream and whisk to loosen it. Gently fold in the remaining egg white with a metal spoon, being careful not to knock the air out.

    5. Pour the mousse into individual glasses or a flan mould, cover with plastic film and leave to set in the fridge for a couple of hours for a softer texture, and up to 6 hours for a firmer texture.

    6. Serve with shortbread and berries, if liked. Superrrbo!

    Silvia's Cucina by Silvia Colloca


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    Photo by Jason Busch

    Jamie at his new home in Avalon. - Photo by Jason Busch

    At Lantern, one of the greatest joys in designing a book is being able to collaborate with our talented authors.

    Our designer Evi O recently worked with Jamie Durie on his book Edible Garden Design. It’s been a busy year for Jamie who has been working on a number of projects including landscape and furniture design, collaborations and even branching out into an organic skincare range.

    Jamie’s direction for the aesthetic of the book was for it to be produce driven. The design brief was straightforward, “have food on every page”.

    With this in mind our design team set to work.

    Jamie is a fan of Florence Broadhurst's designs and had the idea of recreating a particular pattern that he loved. 

    Nadine, Didee and Evi working on endpapers. - Photo by Jason Busch

    Photo by Jason Busch

    Photo by Jason Busch

    The first step was to order boxes and boxes of fresh carrots and parsnips. Once we had the produce, Nadine Bush (Creative Director of Durie Design), Didee Mitton (co-editor), Jason Busch (photographer) and Evi worked together to create Jamie’s ambitious vision. The result was something very original and exciting. It worked so well that Jamie suggested that the look be carried throughout the book. We then ordered even more produce to use on seven more patterns that Jamie and Evi had hand picked.  

    Photo by Jason Busch

    Photo by Jason Busch

    Photo by Jason Busch

    Photo by Jason Busch

    Photo by Jason Busch

    Photo by Jason Busch

    Photo by Jason Busch

    Overall it was a huge job with everyone from Jamie's team and the Lantern team offering a hand. It was a special collaboration that hopefully will inspire our readers and showcase both the importance and beauty of edible gardens.

    Edible Garden Design is now available.


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    Author talk & book signing with Collette Dinnigan, author of Obsessive Creative

    Collette Dinnigan is Australia's most internationally recognised designer, renowned for her beautiful feminine creations. Her latest book is an intimate insight into the life and work of the Australian designer and fashion icon. Collette will be in conversation with Caroline Baum at the Woollahra Village Weekend: an exciting event that will showcase the best of Woollahra with talks, fashion, food, farmer’s markets, art and live music and much more. 

    Contact Queen Street and West Woollahra Association (QSWWA)

    P 0414 966 755

    Author talk & book signing
    Life & Style
    Saturday, November 30, 2013 - 11:00
    NSW
    Collette Dinnigan

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    Kitchen Garden talk with Indira Naidoo, author of The Edible Balcony

    Indira will share her garden wisdom, along with other guest speaks at the Woollahra Village Weekend. Discussing ways to grow from your balcony to heritage gardens, the renowned Australian broadcaster and foodie willl discuss how to create a bountiful kitchen garden of fresh fruit, herbs and vegetables. 

    Contact Queen Street and West Woollahra Association (QSWWA)

    P 0414 966 755

    Author talk
    Garden
    Sunday, December 1, 2013 - 11:30
    NSW
    Indira Naidoo

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  • 11/28/13--16:52: Watermelon Bliss
  • Watermelon salad with pistachios, basil and vincotto by Simon Bryant – Photo by Alan Benson

    Dress up your salads this summer with Simon Bryant’s Watermelon Salad with Pistachios, Basil and Vincotto. A tip, golden midget watermelons work best with this recipe. 

     

    Watermelon salad with pistachios, basil and vincotto


    Serves 6

    Golden midget watermelons are perfect for this summer salad as they’re a little less sugary than other varieties. If you can’t get hold of them, any watermelon will do – just avoid overripe ones. To determine ripeness, feel the weight of the melon and give it a slap. A ping means the melon is unripe, while a dull thud indicates it’s overripe: you want a sound somewhere in the middle.

    Chilling the sliced melon before grilling it allows you to sear the outside without the middle turning to mush. You need to use a lot of oil and salt on the grill, as this produces the smokiness that prevents the dish from tasting like dessert. The generous use of pepper also pushes everything to a savoury finish. To avoid waste, I like to pickle the watermelon rinds. They work brilliantly as a garnish for the salad or you can save them to eat as a snack. The sugar content in the pickle is on the low side, so they will only keep for a week or so and must be stored in the fridge. (You can add more sugar to make them last longer, but they’ll be too sweet to use here.)

    I find that many nuts taste like cardboard, mainly due to extended periods in an overseas warehouse, so I always try to buy local. When you roast the pistachios for this dish, they enter a new realm of scent and flavour. Roast them as close to serving time as possible; I also recommend adding some salt flakes, and flipping the nuts over a few times as a fair bit of the flavour comes from contact with the oven tray. Little details maybe, but they will make all the difference to the final dish.

     

    8 slices golden midget watermelon, cut into large triangles
    8 slices red watermelon, cut into large triangles
    100 ml extra virgin olive oil
    salt flakes and cracked black pepper
    2 small–medium tomatoes, roughly chopped or 8 cherry tomatoes, halved
    ½ bunch basil, leaves picked
    2 sprigs mint, leaves picked
    ¹⁄³ cup (50 g) pistachios, roasted and roughly chopped
    2 tablespoons vincotto

    PICKLED WATERMELON RINDS
    ½ cup (125 ml) rice vinegar
    ¼ cup (55 g) caster sugar
    1 tablespoon fine salt
    watermelon rinds (see above) with 1–1.5 cm flesh attached, skinned and cut into 3 cm lengths


    Method

    1. Chill the sliced watermelon in the fridge for 10 minutes. This will help the melon to seize up a little, which is essential if it’s ripe and in danger of going cactus on a hot grill.

    2. If you’re making the pickled watermelon rinds, bring the vinegar, sugar, salt and 3 tablespoons of water to the boil and heat until the sugar and salt dissolve. Leave to cool. Place the watermelon rinds in a sterilised jar, then pour the pickling liquid over the top.

    3. Preheat a grill-plate to hot. Brush 20–30 ml of olive oil over both sides of the watermelon triangles and sprinkle with a pinch of salt. Grill for 2 minutes or until grill-marks appear and a little smokiness becomes evident. It’s really important not to overcook the watermelon, though, or it will fall apart.

    4. Lightly salt the tomato and rip up the basil leaves. Arrange the grilled watermelon on plates and add the tomato, basil, mint and pistachios. Season with black pepper and drizzle with vincotto and the remaining olive oil.

    5. Serve immediately, with a roughly diced pickled watermelon rind if you like.

    Simon Bryant's Vegies by Simon Bryant


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  • 12/03/13--21:57: Lasagne
  • In this traditional lasagne recipe, the bolognese is made with milk and tomato paste instead of tomatoes, which gives an amazing richness to the sauce. I usually make my own pasta sheets for lasagne, however you can use bought fresh or dried lasagne sheets.

    Method

    1. For the bolognese sauce, place a saucepan over medium heat. Add the oil and butter, and when the butter starts to sizzle, add the onion, celery and garlic. Stir with a wooden spoon, then cook over low heat for 10 minutes until the vegetables are soft but not coloured. Add the sage and stir in, then cook for a further 2 minutes.
    2. Increase the heat to medium–high, add the pancetta and cook, stirring, for around 2 minutes. Add the minced meats and cook for 5 minutes until browned, stirring constantly to break up the meat and ensure it doesn’t stick.
    3. Add the tomato paste and stir in thoroughly. Pour in the wine and cook for a minute or so to reduce by half, stirring and scraping the base of the pan. Stir in the milk and bring to a boil, then season to taste, reduce the heat to low and simmer for 30 minutes or until moist but not runny.
    4. Meanwhile, for the bechamel sauce, melt the butter in a saucepan over medium heat. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 5–6 minutes until incorporated and the mixture is light brown in colour.
    5. Add the warmed milk to the flour mixture and cook, whisking constantly to prevent any lumps forming, until smooth. Cook for a further minute, whisking constantly.
    6. Add a pinch of salt, grate in the parmesan and nutmeg, then whisk well. Adjust the seasoning as necessary, then set aside to cool.
    7. Bring a large saucepan of salted water to a boil and cook the pasta sheets, a couple at a time, until soft and pliable (the cooking time will depend on the type of pasta you use). Immediately transfer the cooked pasta to a bowl of cold water to stop the cooking process. 
    8. Lay the pasta sheets out on a clean tea towel to dry. Preheat the oven to 180°C (350°F).
    9. To assemble, spoon a layer of bolognese sauce into a baking dish about 30 cm x 20 cm (12 inches x 8 inches), then add a layer of grated parmesan, a layer of pasta and a layer of bechamel sauce. Repeat until everything is used up, finishing with a layer of bechamel topped with more grated parmesan and a little cracked pepper. Bake for 35 minutes until browned and bubbling.
    10. Set aside to cool for a few minutes before cutting into portions. Serve with more grated parmesan, a drizzle of oil and a sprinkling of parsley.
    Tobie Puttock
    Serves 6

    5–6 fresh pasta sheets about 30 cm x 20 cm (12 inches x 8 inches), or 
9–12 dried pasta sheets

    100 g (3½ oz) parmesan, grated

    freshly cracked pepper

    extra virgin olive oil, for drizzling

    small handful finely chopped 
flat-leaf parsley

    BOLOGNESE SAUCE

    ¼ cup (60 ml) extra virgin olive oil

    25 g (¾ oz) unsalted butter

    1 red onion, finely diced

    2 sticks celery, finely diced

    2 cloves garlic, finely chopped

    small handful sage leaves, 
roughly sliced

    80 g (2¾ oz) pancetta, cut into cubes

    300 g (10 oz) minced (ground) veal

    300 g (10 oz) minced (ground) pork

    2 tablespoons tomato paste (puree)

    ½ cup (125 ml) white wine

    1 cup (250 ml) milk

    sea salt and freshly cracked pepper

    BECHAMEL SAUCE

    40 g (1¼ oz) butter

    40 g (1¼ oz) plain (all-purpose) flour

    450 ml (14 fl oz) milk, warmed

    pinch of sea salt

    150 g (5 oz) grated parmesan

    ¼ teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg

    Italian Local

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  • 12/04/13--18:17: Tobie's traditional lasagne
  • Tobie Puttock's traditional lasagne - photo by Guy Lavoipierre

    This week at Lantern we released VideoCook, an exciting collaboration with Melbourne chef Tobie Puttock. There are three ebooks in the series: Classic Pasta, Easy Vegetarian and Old-School Desserts, all available from iTunes. Each includes 10 recipes accompanied by video of Tobie showing you the process step-by-step. Here's a recipe from Classic Pasta to try; head to iTunes to download your free sample of the eBooks.

     

    Lasagne


    Serves 6

    In this traditional lasagne recipe, the bolognese is made with milk and tomato paste instead of tomatoes, which gives an amazing richness to the sauce. I usually make my own pasta sheets for lasagne, however you can use bought fresh or dried lasagne sheets.


    5–6 fresh pasta sheets about 30 cm x 20 cm (12 inches x 8 inches), or 
9–12 dried pasta sheets
    100 g (3½ oz) parmesan, grated
    freshly cracked pepper
    extra virgin olive oil, for drizzling
    small handful finely chopped 
flat-leaf parsley

    BOLOGNESE SAUCE
    ¼ cup (60 ml) extra virgin olive oil
    25 g (¾ oz) unsalted butter
    1 red onion, finely diced
    2 sticks celery, finely diced
    2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
    small handful sage leaves, 
roughly sliced
    80 g (2¾ oz) pancetta, cut into cubes
    300 g (10 oz) minced (ground) veal
    300 g (10 oz) minced (ground) pork
    2 tablespoons tomato paste (puree)
    ½ cup (125 ml) white wine
    1 cup (250 ml) milk
    sea salt and freshly cracked pepper

    BECHAMEL SAUCE
    40 g (1¼ oz) butter
    40 g (1¼ oz) plain (all-purpose) flour
    450 ml (14 fl oz) milk, warmed
    pinch of sea salt
    150 g (5 oz) grated parmesan
    ¼ teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
     

    Method

    1. For the bolognese sauce, place a saucepan over medium heat. Add the oil and butter, and when the butter starts to sizzle, add the onion, celery and garlic. Stir with a wooden spoon, then cook over low heat for 10 minutes until the vegetables are soft but not coloured. Add the sage and stir in, then cook for a further 2 minutes.
    2. Increase the heat to medium–high, add the pancetta and cook, stirring, for around 2 minutes. Add the minced meats and cook for 5 minutes until browned, stirring constantly to break up the meat and ensure it doesn’t stick.
    3. Add the tomato paste and stir in thoroughly. Pour in the wine and cook for a minute or so to reduce by half, stirring and scraping the base of the pan. Stir in the milk and bring to a boil, then season to taste, reduce the heat to low and simmer for 30 minutes or until moist but not runny.
    4. Meanwhile, for the bechamel sauce, melt the butter in a saucepan over medium heat. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 5–6 minutes until incorporated and the mixture is light brown in colour.
    5. Add the warmed milk to the flour mixture and cook, whisking constantly to prevent any lumps forming, until smooth. Cook for a further minute, whisking constantly.
    6. Add a pinch of salt, grate in the parmesan and nutmeg, then whisk well. Adjust the seasoning as necessary, then set aside to cool.
    7. Bring a large saucepan of salted water to a boil and cook the pasta sheets, a couple at a time, until soft and pliable (the cooking time will depend on the type of pasta you use). Immediately transfer the cooked pasta to a bowl of cold water to stop the cooking process. 
    8. Lay the pasta sheets out on a clean tea towel to dry. Preheat the oven to 180°C (350°F).
    9. To assemble, spoon a layer of bolognese sauce into a baking dish about 30 cm x 20 cm (12 inches x 8 inches), then add a layer of grated parmesan, a layer of pasta and a layer of bechamel sauce. Repeat until everything is used up, finishing with a layer of bechamel topped with more grated parmesan and a little cracked pepper. Bake for 35 minutes until browned and bubbling.
    10. Set aside to cool for a few minutes before cutting into portions. Serve with more grated parmesan, a drizzle of oil and a sprinkling of parsley.

    Our new VideoCook series


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    Made for iPad

    Tobie Puttock
    Date Published: 
    Monday, December 2, 2013

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    Made for iPad

    Tobie Puttock
    Date Published: 
    Monday, December 2, 2013

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