Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Channel Catalog


older | 1 | .... | 8 | 9 | (Page 10) | 11 | 12 | .... | 25 | newer

    0 0

    This is a sweet little recipe given to me by my assistant Madeleine, whose granny had handed it down to her. It makes a wonderfully tart yet sweet syrup, which you then mix with soda water — and perhaps a splash of vodka, if you like.

    Method
    1. Place the sugar and 2 cups (500 ml) water in a medium-sized saucepan over medium heat until the sugar has dissolved. Bring to the boil and cook over high heat for 15 minutes or until a thin syrup forms. Remove the pan from the heat, then stir through the lemon zest and juice and transfer to a jug. Cover and leave to stand in the fridge for a minimum of 5 hours.
    2. Strain the cordial, then pour into sterilised bottles or jars (see page 11), placing a few lemon slices and a handful of mint leaves in each, and store in the fridge. To serve, mix one part cordial with five parts soda water and top up with ice cubes.
    Katie Quinn Davies
    Makes 1 litre cordial

    4 cups (880 g) caster sugar

    Finely grated zest of 5 lemons

    Juice of 7 lemons (you need about 2 cups/500 ml)

    Lemon slices and mint leaves, to garnish

    Soda water and ice cubes, to serve

    What Katie Ate

    0 0
  • 01/22/14--17:36: Australia Day Menu
  • Dried Apricot Pavlova by Maggie Beer - Photo by Earl Carter

    Whatever you've got planned for this Australia Day, Lantern has your lunch menu covered. Juicy prawns, succulant lamb, sweet beetroot salad, fresh lemonade and a pavlova to top it all off. This menu brings together iconic Aussie foods that will put a cherry on your Sunday. 

     

    Matt Moran's BBQ Prawns with Nam Jim Dressing 

    Monica Trapaga's Chuletas or the Chop by Lil

    Gary Mehigan's Roasted Beetroot Salad with Hazelnuts and Watercress

    Katie Quinn Davies'Homemade Lemonade Cordial 

    Maggie Beer's Dried Apricot Pavlova 

    BBQ Prawns with Nam Jim Dressing by Matt Moran - Photo by Chris Chen

    Chuletas or the Chop by Lil by Monica Trapaga - Photo by Chris Chen

    Roasted Beetroot Salad with Hazelnuts and Watercress by Gary Mehigan - Photo by Simon Griffiths 

    Madeleine's Homemade Lemonade Cordial by Katie Quinn Davies - Photo by Katie Quinn Davies  


    0 0

    Kylie Kwong's Crispy Soy-Roasted Pork Belly - photo by Earl Carter

    Everyone I know just loves pork crackling, and this recipe results in a great layer of crackling. To get good crackling, it’s important to follow the steps here closely, especially the initial scalding of the skin, and then allowing the pork to thoroughly dry out, uncovered in the refrigerator, after it has marinated.

     

    Crispy Soy-Roasted Pork Belly


    Serve as part of a banquet of 4
     
    1 x 800g piece of free-range boneless pork belly, skin on and scored (ask your butcher to do this)
    500 ml (2 cups) boiling water
    1 tablespoon sesame oil
    1 tablespoon salt flakes 

    MARINADE
    2 tablespoons brown rice miso paste
    1 tablespoon five-spice powder
    1 tablespoon brown sugar
    1 tablespoon light soy sauce


    Method

    1. Place pork belly, skin-side up, on a wire rack over the sink. Pour over boiling water to scald the pork skin – this will help the skin crisp up into crunchy crackling. Pat rind thoroughly dry with kitchen paper and place pork, uncovered, in refrigerator for 2 hours.

    2. Remove pork from fridge and place, skin-side up, on a chopping board. Using the tip of a sharp knife, stab the pork skin repeatedly until the surface is covered with holes, being careful not to go all the way through. Turn the pork belly over and make cuts about 2 cm apart and 1 cm deep.

    3. Combine marinade ingredients in a bowl and mix well. Rub marinade evenly over the flesh side of the pork (not the skin) and massage well into the cuts.

    4. Place pork, skin-side up, on a wire rack (this same rack will be used for roasting the pork, so make sure it is ovenproof and fits inside a roasting tin) and place over a tray or large plate to catch any drips. Place in refrigerator and leave pork uncovered overnight, during which time the skin will dry out. The drier the skin, the better the crackling when roasted.

    5. The next day, bring pork to room temperature and preheat oven to 150°C.

    6. Transfer pork and wire rack to a roasting tin. Rub skin well with the sesame oil, then scatter salt all over. Roast for 1½–2 hours or until tender (to test, pierce the meat with a skewer – you should meet no resistance). Increase the oven temperature to 220°C and continue roasting for 15 minutes. This final blast of heat will crisp up the skin, turning it into crackling.

    7. Remove pork from oven and allow to rest, uncovered, in a warm place for 15 minutes.

    8. To serve, cut into 1 cm thick slices.

    Simple Chinese Cooking Class by Kylie Kwong


    0 0
  • 02/05/14--22:00: A Sweet End to Your Week
  • David Herbert's Chocolate Fudge Cake - Photo by Nato Welton

    Fudge cakes are often quite heavy in texture, but thanks to the self-raising flour and bicarbonate of soda, this cake does not fall into that category. It is delicious simply dusted with icing sugar, but when I’m in need of a big chocolate fix, I also love to cover it with chocolate ganache icing.

     

    Chocolate fudge cake


    Serves 10
     
    100 g unsalted butter, diced and softened at room temperature
    2 large free-range eggs, lightly beaten
    250 g caster sugar
    100 g dark chocolate, melted
    280 g self-raising flour
    1 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
    pinch of salt
    2 tablespoons cocoa
    250 ml milk
    1 tablespoon lemon juice
     
    CHOCOLATE GANACHE
    100 g unsalted butter
    250 g dark chocolate, chopped


    Method

    1. Preheat the oven to 180°C (Gas Mark 4). Grease a 20 cm springform tin and line the base with baking paper.

    2. Combine the butter, egg, sugar and melted chocolate in a large bowl. Sift in the flour, bicarbonate of soda, salt and cocoa. Combine the milk and lemon juice in a jug (it should curdle slightly) and pour into the bowl. Beat with a wooden spoon or hand-held electric beaters for 1–2 minutes or until smooth.

    3. Spoon the batter into the tin. Bake for 50–60 minutes or until firm in the centre. Cool in the tin for about 10 minutes, then turn out onto a wire rack to cool completely.

    4. Once the cake is cool, make the ganache. Melt the butter and chocolate in a heatproof bowl set over a saucepan of barely simmering water, stirring occasionally (make sure the bowl doesn’t touch the water). Cool for about 20 minutes or until the icing has thickened slightly. Spread the icing over the top and side of the cake. Store the cake in an airtight container for up to 5 days.


    Best-Ever Baking Recipes by David Herbert 


    0 0
  • 02/12/14--20:04: Almond Bar Gourmond 2
  • Award: 
    Gourmand World Cookbook Awards
    Book: 
    Almond Bar
    Award Prize: 
    Winner
    Award Year: 
    2014
    Award Category Override: 
    Best Arab Cuisine Cook (Australia)

    0 0
  • 02/12/14--20:05: Maggie's Christmas Gourmand
  • Award: 
    Gourmand World Cookbook Awards
    Book: 
    Maggie's Christmas
    Award Prize: 
    Winner
    Award Year: 
    2014
    Award Category Override: 
    Best Entertainment Cookbook (Australia)

    0 0
  • 02/12/14--20:06: Love Italy
  • Award: 
    Gourmand World Cookbook Awards
    Book: 
    Love Italy
    Award Prize: 
    Winner
    Award Year: 
    2014
    Award Category Override: 
    Cookbook of the Year (Australia)

    0 0
  • 02/12/14--20:09: Big Apple Gourmand
  • Award: 
    Gourmand World Cookbook Awards
    Book: 
    A Bite of the Big Apple: My Food Adventure in New York
    Award Prize: 
    Winner
    Award Year: 
    2014
    Award Category Override: 
    Best US Cuisine Book

    0 0
  • 02/12/14--20:10: Things I Love APA Book
  • Award: 
    Gourmand World Cookbook Awards
    Book: 
    Things I Love
    Award Prize: 
    Winner
    Award Year: 
    2013
    Award Category Override: 
    Best Designed Book of the Year

    0 0
  • 02/12/14--20:11: Things I Love APA Illust.
  • Award: 
    APA Book Design Awards
    Book: 
    Things I Love
    Award Prize: 
    Winner
    Award Year: 
    2013
    Award Category Override: 
    Best Designed General Illustrated Book
    Award Prize Override: 
    Finalist

    0 0
  • 02/12/14--20:12: My Greek Island Home
  • Award: 
    APA Book Design Awards
    Book: 
    My Greek Island Home
    Award Prize: 
    Winner
    Award Year: 
    2013
    Award Category Override: 
    Best Designed General Illustrated Book
    Award Prize Override: 
    Commended

    0 0
  • 02/12/14--20:12: My Greek Island Home Cover
  • Award: 
    APA Book Design Awards
    Book: 
    My Greek Island Home
    Award Prize: 
    Winner
    Award Year: 
    2013
    Award Category Override: 
    Best Designed Cover of the Year
    Award Prize Override: 
    Finalist

    0 0
  • 02/12/14--20:13: LCC MAggie APA
  • Award: 
    APA Book Design Awards
    Book: 
    Lantern Cookery Classics: Maggie Beer
    Award Prize: 
    Winner
    Award Year: 
    2013
    Award Category Override: 
    Best Designed Cookbook
    Award Prize Override: 
    Finalist

    0 0
  • 02/12/14--20:14: What Katie Ate APA
  • Award: 
    APA Book Design Awards
    Book: 
    What Katie Ate
    Award Prize: 
    Winner
    Award Year: 
    2013
    Award Category Override: 
    Best Designed Cookbook
    Award Prize Override: 
    Finalist

    0 0
  • 02/23/14--17:22: Gourmand 14 World
  • Book: 
    Love Italy
    Award Prize: 
    Short-listed
    Award Year: 
    2014
    Award Category Override: 
    Best in the world Cookbook of the Year
    Award Override: 
    Gourmand World Cookbook Awards

    0 0
  • 02/23/14--17:24: Gourmand 14 World
  • Book: 
    Almond Bar
    Award Prize: 
    Short-listed
    Award Year: 
    2014
    Award Category Override: 
    Best in the world Arab Cuisine Cook
    Award Override: 
    Gourmand World Cookbook Awards

    0 0
  • 02/23/14--17:29: Gourmand 14 World Big Apple
  • Book: 
    A Bite of the Big Apple: My Food Adventure in New York
    Award Prize: 
    Short-listed
    Award Year: 
    2014
    Award Category Override: 
    Best in the world US Cuisine Cook
    Award Override: 
    Gourmand World Cookbook Awards

    0 0

    Nonna Franca’s biscuits have been part of our celebrations for over forty years. Trouble is, nobody seems to remember who Nonna Franca was, or who she belonged to! I’m sure Nonna Franca is no longer with us, bless her soul, but at least her biscuits live on. If you can’t find chocolate icing sugar, make your own by mixing 160 g pure icing sugar with 20 g unsweetened, Dutch-process cocoa.

    Method
    1. Preheat the oven to 180°C fan-forced and line two baking trays with baking paper.
    2. Beat the eggs and sugar with hand-held electric beaters until pale and creamy. Add the cream and continue beating to combine, then add the cocoa, melted butter and spices and beat until combined. Using a wooden spoon, fold in the nuts, then the flours, to form a soft dough.
    3. Take teaspoonfuls of the dough and roll into balls, then place them on the prepared trays at 3 cm intervals. Bake for 15–20 minutes, then remove from the oven and transfer to wire racks to cool completely.
    4. Place the chocolate icing sugar in a bowl and gradually add water, a teaspoonful at a time, stirring until thick but pourable (you’ll need about 1 tablespoon water in total).
    5. Dip the top of each biscuit into the icing and return it to the wire rack for the icing to set.
    6. These biscuits will keep stored in an airtight container for up to 2 weeks.
    Teresa Oates and Angela Villella
    Makes about 60

    2 × 70 g eggs

    Mangia! Mangia! Gatherings

    0 0

    Duck and other game birds are the meats we traditionally serve at Christmas; turkey has only recently appeared on our Christmas table. The principle is the same: a special, rich meat that is not eaten every day. This method of slow-cooking results in an incredibly crispy skin and leaves the rich meat almost falling off the bone. Drain the  remaining fat in the tin and keep it to roast potatoes in – the flavour is delicious.

    Method
    1. Preheat the oven to 160°C fan-forced. Place a wire rack over a baking dish or roasting tin large enough to hold the two ducks.
    2. Place two garlic cloves and two sprigs of rosemary in the cavity of each duck.
    3. Juice both halves of the orange and add a drizzle of olive oil, then rub this over the skin of each duck and season with plenty of salt and pepper. Tuck the squeezed orange halves into the cavities of the ducks.
    4. Place the ducks on the rack and roast for 2½–3 hours, basting every 30 minutes with the pan juices. The meat should be well cooked and tender and the skin crispy. 
    5. Serve immediately on a platter with the orange slices.
     
    Teresa Oates and Angela Villella
    Serves 8

    2 × 2 kg ducks, rinsed and wiped dry

    4 cloves garlic

    4 × 8 cm sprigs rosemary

    1 orange, halved

    olive oil, for drizzling

    salt and freshly ground pepper

    thick orange slices studded with rosemary, to serve

    Mangia! Mangia! Gatherings

    0 0

    My dad, Romolo, was a bricklayer, so there were always spare bricks lying around in the backyard. Mum would put them to good use, wrapping them in foil and using them to weigh down a whole butterflied chicken to help it cook evenly. This clever idea resulted in moist, perfectly cooked chicken every time. Serve this with a salad of mixed leaves and some roast potatoes with herbs.

    Method
    1. Rinse the chicken under cold water and pat dry with paper towel. Butterfly the bird by cutting down each side of the spine and removing it, then pressing the two sides out flat.
    2. In a bowl, mix together the breadcrumbs, parsley, anchovy, capers, lemon zest and salt and pepper to taste.
    3. Create a pocket by carefully lifting the skin of the breast and thighs with the tips of your fingers. Gently push the stuffing evenly into the pocket. Rub the skin of the chicken with olive oil and season with salt and pepper.
    4. Heat an ovenproof frying pan large enough to hold the butterflied chicken over medium–high heat. Place in 
    5. the pan, skin-side down, and place a foil-wrapped brick on top to act as a weight. Reduce the heat to medium and cook for 25 minutes. 
    6. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 190°C fan-forced. Turn the chicken over, place the brick on top again, and cook for 5–6 minutes before transferring the pan to the oven. Roast for 30 minutes or until cooked through.
    7. Joint the chicken and serve with the pan juices drizzled over the top.
    Teresa Oates and Angela Villella
    Serves 4

    1 × 2 kg free-range chicken

    1 cup (70 g) fresh breadcrumbs

    2 tablespoons chopped flat-leaf parsley

    4–5 anchovy fillets in oil, chopped

    1 tablespoon salted capers, rinsed and chopped

    finely grated zest of 1 lemon

    salt and freshly ground pepper

    olive oil, for rubbing

    Mangia! Mangia! Gatherings

older | 1 | .... | 8 | 9 | (Page 10) | 11 | 12 | .... | 25 | newer